Ian Knauer’s Bread

From The Farm hosted by Ian Knauer (book here!)

DSC_0853

I have been hopelessly addicted to watching The Farm. It’s on Amazon instant video, and I think I watched the entire 13 episodes in four days (who does laundry during nap time anyway?). I am now completely head over heels in love with the book. There are several bread recipes listed in this soul feeding cookbook and I plan to make them all (is that too ambitious? please tell me it’s not).

DSC_0863

First up is a skillet bread used for BLT’s, as inspired by the show. This bread will be making repeat appearances at our dinner table this summer. It is so ridiculously easy – simple, quick, with few dirty dishes (yes!) and it turns out perfect. As in super crusty and crunchy on the outside and incredibly soft and moist on the inside. It was dreamy for BLT’s and made delightfully soft while still crunchy garlic bread. It holds up well for several days, retaining that super soft interior and crusty exterior (just be sure to store it in a paper bag). It is safe to say that I am completely, utterly smitten. I think you should be, too.

DSC_0878

Here we go!

In a large bowl, mix flour, yeast and salt with your hands.

DSC_0783

Add in warm water, and mix with your hand until incorporated.

DSC_0789

This is a very wet and sticky dough.

DSC_0792

Turn dough out onto a clean work surface.

DSC_0803

Knead by slapping the dough on your work surface, pulling the dough toward yourself…

DSC_0798

…and folding it over onto itself. Dough will be very sticky.

DSC_0801

Knead until the dough comes together and becomes smooth. Lightly flour the surface of the dough, scrape it up, and fold the edges of the dough into itself to make a round form.

DSC_0808

Flour a bowl (such as the bowl you mixed it in) and cover with a kitchen towel.

DSC_0813

DSC_0816

Let rise for one hour.

DSC_0824

Once doubled, repeat the folding process by flouring your work surface and folding the dough over into itself to make a round form (fold edges or corners inward). Dough will be very soft and smooth.

DSC_0826

DSC_0831

Put the dough in a 10″ floured cast iron skillet and lightly flour the top.

DSC_0833

Cover with a kitchen towel and let rise for one hour. 

DSC_0836

DSC_0838

After the dough is doubled, cut steam holes in the top. Do what you like – slashes, an “x”, or use your kitchen scissors and cut into the dough creating rows of spikes (done here). 

DSC_0841

Bake at 475 F for about 45 minutes – tap the bottom, it will sound hollow when done. Store in a paper bag. 

DSC_0844

Ingredients

4 1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour (can use bread flour, too, if that’s what you have)

1 teaspoon instant yeast

1 tablespoon salt

1 3/4 cups warm water

Directions

In a large bowl, mix flour, yeast and salt with your hands. Add in warm water, and mix with your hand until incorporated. This is a very wet and sticky dough. Turn dough out onto a clean work surface. Knead by slapping the dough on your work surface, pulling the dough toward yourself and folding it over onto itself. Dough will be very sticky. Knead until the dough comes together and becomes smooth. Lightly flour the surface of the dough, scrape it up, and fold the edges of the dough into itself to make a round form. Flour a bowl (such as the bowl you mixed it in) and cover with a kitchen towel. Let rise for one hour. 

Once doubled, repeat the folding process by flouring your work surface and folding the dough over into itself to make a round form (fold edges or corners inward). Dough will be very soft and smooth. Put the dough in a 10″ floured cast iron skillet and lightly flour the top. Cover with a kitchen towel and let rise for one hour. 

After the dough is doubled, cut steam holes in the top. Do what you like – slashes, an “x”, or use your kitchen scissors and cut into the dough creating rows of spikes (done here). Bake at 475 F for about 45 minutes – tap the bottom, it will sound hollow when done. Store in a paper bag. 

Advertisements

Published by

girlkneadsbread

My adventures with bread and the deliciousness of life.

2 thoughts on “Ian Knauer’s Bread”

  1. I believe there must be an error in this recipe. To bake a loaf of bread at 475deg for 45 minutes would have become charcoal. I checked it at 20 minutes and it was just about done. Left it for another 5 minutes. Could you possibly correct the recipe?

    Thank you
    Marie

    Like

    1. I’m sorry the baking time seemed off for you! Perhaps your oven works much differently? I double checked with the original recipe, and it states 45 min at 475 F. I have made this bread (using a newer convection oven) multiple times this way, and have had no problems. Did you make as the recipe states – in a 10 inch cast iron skillet? I will say, at 40-45 minutes it seems as if it’s ruined, however, when you take it out and let it cool, it’s perfect! The crust is meant to be thicker and is very dark. The inside will remain very light and soft and, per the “slapping” way if kneading, will be full of air pockets. This dough and method of kneading isn’t typical for most American breads. I wish you continued success in your baking!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s